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2017-2018 Catalog

Frontiers Abroad

In 2009 Lafayette College and Frontiers Abroad, New Zealand entered into an agreement through which Lafayette became the "School of Record" for Frontiers Abroad.

Students completing the Frontiers Abroad programs in Geology and Earth Studies and courses at their partner institutions in New Zealand, the University of Canterbury and the University of Auckland, earn Lafayette credits that are reported to their home campuses on a Lafayette transcript.

The program and its courses are reviewed and approved through the Registrar's Office and the Office of International and Off-Campus Education in conjunction with full-time Lafayette faculty in our related programs. Participation by both faculty and staff from Lafayette and Frontiers Abroad includes regular curricular review as well as site visits and program assessment on both campuses.

EVST 360 Mãori, Indigenous Knowledge and the Environment

This course examines Mãori and indigenous knowledge from the perspective of their culture, as well as their relationship to modern science, natural resources management and the environment. Students explore how indigenous knowledge is utilized to manage New Zealand's natural resources through field based education and community engagement. Led by Dr. Daniel Hikuroa, a leading Mãori, a leading Mãori earth scientist and research director of Ngã Pae o te Mãramatanga at the University of Auckland, this program challenges the dominance of western approaches to natural resource management and introduces students to multi-generational management approaches drawn from both indigenous knowledge and science. The course is delivered through a series of field modules, community engagement, and evening readings and lectures.

EVSC 364 Field Study in Earth Systems

For centuries, New Zealand and South Pacific peoples have had to cope and adapt to frequent volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, floods, storms and the threat of sea-level rise. These island nations have had to develop an acute understanding of the Earth's systems in order to sustainably manage natural resources and the environment and ensure survival. This course is designed as a series of field modules exposing students to marine ecology, geomorphology, environmental science, hydrology, environmental guardianship, cultural studies, chemistry, natural hazards and resources. It is open to students with a background in any of the natural sciences, environmental science, environmental studies, and engineering. After five weeks in the field, students will have developed essential field skills and techniques and collected field data to be processed and developed as part of a semester research method course at the University of Auckland.

EVSC 366 Field Research in Earth Systems

A seminar-style course in earth systems research that is open only to students who complete Earth Systems Field Camp in New Zealand. Students will be exposed to different areas of research and methods in earth systems science as a basis for developing his/her own research project using data collected during Field Camp. In addition, students will be introduced to analytical facilities and, in some cases, will have the opportunity to prepare samples and operate facilities as part of his/her research project. The final product will be a research report and conference-style presentation. [W]

GEOL 365 Field Geology

New Zealand is one of the youngest land masses on earth and characterized by landscapes that are rapidly evolving and being reshaped by active geologic processes. In a series of field modules, students will develop field skills in stratigraphy, structure, neo-tectonics, igneous and metamorphic petrology, glaciology, volcanology, fluvial systems, geothermal systems, and hazard assessment. After five weeks in the field, students will have gained an understanding of how the New Zealand micro-continent has evolved, and will have collected field data to be processed and developed as part of a semester research methods course at the University of Canterbury.

GEOL 367 Field Research in Geology

A seminar-style course in geologic research that is open only to students who complete Geology Field Camp in New Zealand. Students will be exposed to different areas of research and methods in geology as a basis for developing his/her own research project using data collected during Field Camp. In addition, students will be introduced to analytical facilities and, in some cases, will have the opportunity to prepare samples and operate facilities as part of his/her research project. The final product will be a research report and conference-style presentation.[W]

 

GEOL 380 Independent Study

Independent study research course for students enrolled in the Frontiers Abroad program. This course is designed to link field mapping and/or data collection with an independent research project to analyze, process and interpret data. As part of this course, students conduct their own independent research component as part of a larger team research project. At the end of the course students will have completed a series of learning objectives, written a short journal-article style paper, and delivered a professional research presentation.